the 22 immutable laws of branding pdf free download

the 22 immutable laws of branding pdf free download

Newspapers, cigarettes, lottery tickets. Every decent delicatessen prides itself on carrying everything. What did Fred DeLuca do? He narrowed the focus to one type of sandwich, the submarine sandwich.

Good things happen when you contract your brand rather than expand it. Fred DeLuca called his chain Subway, a great name for a store that sold just submarine sandwiches. It was a name that no consumer could forget. The second smart move concerned operations. When you make only submarine sandwiches, you get pretty good at making submarine sandwiches. Subway has become the eighth-largest fast-food chain in the United States. The company has more than 15, units in seventy-five countries. He was forced to disclose his salary in a court case.

But he wanted to grow. What is the conventional way to grow? Adding more things to sell. Instead, Charles Lazarus threw out the furniture and focused on toys. And the chain has become the model for the specialty stores or category killers on the retail scene.

Home Depot in home supplies. The Gap in everyday casual clothing. The Limited in clothes for working women. PetsMart in pet supplies. Blockbuster Video in video rentals. CompUSA in computers. Foot Locker in athletic shoes. Good things happen when you contract rather than expand your business. Most retail category killers follow the same five-step pattern. Narrow the focus. A powerful branding program always starts by contracting the category, not expanding it.

Stock in depth. Buy cheap. Sell cheap. When you can buy cheap, you can sell cheap and still maintain good margins. Dominate the category. The ultimate objective of any branding program is to dominate a category. When you dominate a category, you become extremely powerful. Microsoft has 95 percent of the worldwide market for desktop computer operating systems.

Intel has 80 percent of the worldwide market for microprocessors. Coca-Cola has 70 percent of the worldwide market for cola. Why then do so few marketers want to contract their brands? Why do most marketers want to expand their brands? Because people look at successful companies and are led astray. They assume that companies are successful because they are expanding.

Starbucks, for example, currently is busy getting into everything from ice cream to bottled drinks to tea. Now ask yourself: Can I get rich by doing what rich people do? Rich people buy expensive houses and eat in expensive restaurants.

They drive Rolls-Royces and wear Rolex watches. They vacation on the Riviera. Would buying an expensive house, a Rolls-Royce, and a Rolex make you rich? Just the opposite. Most people search for success in all the wrong places. They try to find out what rich and successful companies are currently doing and then try to copy them. What do rich companies do? They buy Gulfstream jets. They run programs like empowerment, leadership training, open-book management, and total-quality management. And they line-extend their brands.

Will extending your brand? Just as unlikely. If you want to be rich, you have to do what rich people did before they were rich—you have to find out what they did to become rich. If you want to have a successful company, you have to do what successful companies did before they were successful.

As it happens, they all did the same thing. They narrowed their focus. When Little Caesars first got started, it sold pizza, fried shrimp, fish and chips, and roasted chicken. By expanding their menus or contracting them? Good things happen when you narrow the focus. Most marketers confuse brand building with brand maintenance. Anita Roddick built The Body Shop into a major brand with no advertising at all. Instead she traveled the world on a relentless quest for publicity, pushing her ideas about the environment.

It was the endless torrent of newspaper and magazine articles, plus radio and television interviews, that literally created The Body Shop brand. Or just plain Miller. Would better, fresher creative work have built a beer called Miller Regular into a brand leader? There is no publicity potential in a regular beer with a line-extended name like Miller.

In the past, it may have been true that a beefy advertising budget was the key ingredient in the brand-building process. We live in an overcommunicated society, where each of us gets hit with hundreds of commercial messages daily.

Today brands are born, not made. And just how do you generate publicity? The best way to generate publicity is by being first. In other words, by being the first brand in a new category. When your brand can make news, it has a chance to generate publicity. And the best way to make news is to announce a new category, not a new product. What others say about your brand is much more powerful than what you say about it yourself. Yet for years public relations has been treated as a secondary function to advertising.

PR people even used to measure their successes in terms of advertising space. Publicity stories were converted into equivalent advertising expenditures. Even worse, marketing strategies were usually formulated first into advertising slogans. Then the public relations people were asked to reinforce the advertising by creating PR programs to communicate those slogans.

Not anymore. Today brands are built with publicity and maintained with advertising. The cart is now driving the horse. Why are public relations departments in most companies still subservient to advertising departments? Why are nine of the top ten public relations firms still owned by advertising agencies instead of vice versa? Why have the media ignored the biggest news story in marketing?

Nobody ever notices the grass growing or pays attention to a trend that is slow in developing. Take facsimile, for example. Americans will send 65 billion pages of faxes this year, more than per person. And 50 percent of all international telephone calls are now fax calls. It happened too slowly. On the other hand, the opposite is true of the Internet. The rise of the Internet happened so quickly that it created a blaze of publicity, as did the rapid fall of Internet stocks.

Advertising executives in particular are inclined to slight public relations. But what works in branding today is publicity, not advertising. This is especially true in the high-tech field. By publicity, not by advertising. Years ago we worked with Lotus Development Corp. Yet typically the Lotus advertising people ignored the groupware idea in favor of nonsensical advertising pabulum.

Most companies develop their branding strategies as if advertising were their primary communications vehicle. Strategy should be developed first from a publicity point of view.

All of its tanks, planes, and missiles just keep a country from being overrun by one of its enemies. Publicity is a powerful tool, but sooner or later a brand outlives its publicity potential. The process normally goes through two distinct phases. Phase one involves the introduction of the new category—the plain-paper copier, for example, introduced by Xerox in Hundreds of magazine and newspaper articles were written about the launch of the copier.

Xerox executives also appeared on numerous television shows to demonstrate their new baby. Much was written about the potential of the new category. Phase two concerns the rise of the company that pioneered the new category. Again, hundreds of articles were written about the marketing and financial successes of Xerox, a company that rose from the ashes of Haloid, a manufacturer of photographic paper.

Today, everybody knows that Xerox pioneered xerography and has become a global leader in copiers. Almost every successful brand goes through the same process. As the publicity dies out, each of these brands has had to shift to massive advertising to defend its position. First publicity, then advertising is the general rule. Anybody who thinks advertising built Microsoft into a macrobrand should go back and read Chapter 3 again. Sooner or later a leader has to shift its branding strategy from publicity to advertising.

By raising the price of admission, advertising makes it difficult for a competitor to carve out a substantial share of the market. To attack a heavily defended neighboring country requires substantial military expenditures. Leaders should not look on their advertising budgets as investments that will pay dividends. Instead leaders should look on their advertising budgets as insurance that will protect them against losses caused by competitive attacks.

What should a brand leader advertise? Brand leadership, of course. Leadership is the single most important motivating factor in consumer behavior. Most leaders advertise some aspect of their quality. What does the reader, the viewer, or the listener to the advertisement really think when you make the claim that you produce a better product?

Almost every ad makes some type of better-product claim. What does the prospect think? You might, but most people believe that Heinz is the best. Heinz is the leader and everybody knows that in this freedom-loving, democratic, equal- opportunity country of ours, the better product always wins. Such claims are quite rare. They do consumer research.

They ask customers why they buy the brands they buy. As a matter of fact, they go out of their way to deny it. Why do you drink Coca-Cola? Or rent from Hertz? Or drink Budweiser beer? Everyone knows the better product will win in the marketplace. Since most people want to buy the better product, most people buy the leading brand. Advertising is a powerful tool, not to build leadership of a fledgling brand, but to maintain that leadership once it is obtained.

Companies that want to protect their well-established brands should not hesitate to use massive advertising programs to smother the competition. Indeed, advertising is expensive. And top-rated prime-time shows are equally ridiculous from a monetary point of view. So why spend the money? What comes to mind when you think about owning a Mercedes-Benz?

Most people do. You might also associate attributes like expensive, German, well engineered, and reliable with the brand, but the core differentiation is prestige. Lamborghinis are expensive, Audis are German, Hondas are well engineered, and Toyotas are reliable, but none of these brands conveys the prestige of a Mercedes. A word that nobody else owns. What prestige is to Mercedes, safety is to Volvo. And, as a result, over the past decade Volvo has become the largest-selling European luxury car in America.

Could you build a safer car than a Volvo? Probably not. What comes to mind when you think about owning a BMW? The ultimate driving machine. Yet none of these three brands Mercedes, Volvo, and BMW is a perfect example of the law of the word since they have all recently violated the law.

Mercedes has moved into less expensive, less prestigious cars. Volvo into sporty cars. And BMW into more luxurious cars. The minute a brand begins to stand for something in the mind, the company that owns the brand looks for ways to broaden the base, to get into other markets, to capture other attributes.

This is a serious error and one of the most common mistakes in branding. What word do you associate with the Kleenex brand? On the surface, Kleenex seems unfocused. There are sport Kleenexes, family-size Kleenexes, psychedelic Kleenexes. Kleenex is by far the leading brand of pocket tissue. What word does Kleenex own in the mind?

Kleenex owns the category word. Kleenex is tissue. Kleenex was the first pocket tissue. Before Kimberly-Clark introduced Kleenex, there was no market for a pocket tissue.

But instead of expanding to toilet tissue and paper towels, Kleenex kept hammering away at its original focus. The pocket handkerchief virtually disappeared from the market, replaced by Kleenex tissues in their many variations. You know your brand owns the category name when people use your brand name generically. They were first, plain and simple. You can only become generic by being the first brand and establishing the category.

Quite often you can create a new category by simply narrowing your focus. Emery Air Freight, started in , was the first air cargo carrier. But Emery fell into the Chevrolet trap.

Instead of focusing on one type of service, it offered everything. Overnight, inexpensive two- or three-day service, small packages, large packages. In the early seventies, it was a struggling player in the delivery business. But in a streak of brilliance, CEO Fred Smith decided to narrow its focus to overnight delivery only. So what did Federal Express do next? It went global, where the very thing it had become known for, overnight delivery, is impossible.

And it got into less expensive two-and three-day delivery. And it recently bought a trucking company. Virtually every marketing move Federal Express has made in the last dozen years has moved the company further away from the overnight concept. Does this expansion hurt the brand? Does it hurt the company? Maybe not, as long as there are no competitors astute enough to narrow the focus and put the same squeeze on Federal Express that Federal Express put on Emery Air Freight.

So what did Prego do? With this one type of sauce Prego won 27 percent of the market. The same principle holds true in many different categories, no matter how narrow or obscure the industry.

Bloomberg LP was the first company to introduce a device that would help money managers contrast and compare financial data. Words are the key to brand building. Reality, of course, rests in a visual world of shapes, colors, textures, and dimensions.

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A powerful branding program always starts by contracting the category, not expanding it. Stock in depth. A typical Toys R Us store carries 10, toys versus 3, toys for a large department store. When you dominate a category, you become extremely powerful. Microsoft has 95 percent of the worldwide market for desktop computer operating systems.

Intel has 80 percent of the worldwide market for microprocessors. Coca-Cola has 70 percent of the worldwide market for cola. Why then do so few marketers want to contract their brands?

Why do most marketers want to expand their brands? Because people look at successful companies and are led astray. They assume that companies are successful because they are expanding. Starbucks, for example, currently is busy getting into everything from ice cream to bottled drinks to tea. Now ask yourself: Can I get rich by doing what rich people do? Rich people buy expensive houses and eat in expensive restaurants. They drive Rolls-Royces and wear Rolex watches. They vacation on the Riviera.

Would buying an expensive house, a Rolls-Royce, and a Rolex make you rich? Just the opposite. Most people search for success in all the wrong places. They try to find out what rich and successful companies are currently doing and then try to copy them.

What do rich companies do? They buy Gulfstream jets. They run programs like empowerment, leadership training, open-book management, and total-quality management. And they line-extend their brands. Will extending your brand? Just as unlikely. If you want to be rich, you have to do what rich people did before they were rich—you have to find out what they did to become rich. If you want to have a successful company, you have to do what successful companies did before they were successful.

When Little Caesars first got started, it sold pizza, fried shrimp, fish and chips, and roasted chicken. By expanding their menus or contracting them?

The way to do that is to have a superior understanding of the consumer, which leads to better, fresher, more powerful creative work that ultimately builds brands. Building brand leaders with better, fresher creative work?

We think not. Most marketers confuse brand building with brand maintenance. Anita Roddick built The Body Shop into a major brand with no advertising at all. Instead she traveled the world on a relentless quest for publicity, pushing her ideas about the environment. It was the endless torrent of newspaper and magazine articles, plus radio and television interviews, that literally created The Body Shop brand. Or just plain Miller. Would better, fresher creative work have built a beer called Miller Regular into a brand leader?

There is no publicity potential in a regular beer with a line-extended name like Miller. In the past, it may have been true that a beefy advertising budget was the key ingredient in the brand-building process. We live in an overcommunicated society, where each of us gets hit with hundreds of commercial messages daily.

Today brands are born, not made. And just how do you generate publicity?

Faster previews. Personalized experience. Get started with a FREE account. The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing - fi. Load more similar PDF files. PDF Drive investigated dozens of problems and listed the biggest global issues facing the world today. Let's Change The World Together. Pdfdrive:hope Give books away. Get books you want. The 22 immutable laws of branding pdf free download yourself: What would I do with my life if I knew there were no limits? Not loaded yet? Try Again. Report Close Quick Download Go to remote file. Documents can only be sent to your Kindle devices from e-mail accounts that you added to your Approved Personal Document E-mail List. What's the problem with this file? Promotional spam Copyrighted the 22 immutable laws of branding pdf free download Offensive language or threatening Something else. the 22 immutable laws of branding pdf free download Since we wrote The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding, the Internet has arrived on the Free-PC, onoroff.biz, and a host of sites based on giving products or​. Killers_of_the_Flower_Moon_-_David_onoroff.biz Killers of the Flower Moon. Ries Al, Ries Laura, The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding, Symphonya. Emerging Issues in. Management (onoroff.biz), n. 1, , pp. Download & View Al Ries - The 22 Immutable Laws Of Branding as PDF for free. More details. Pages: Preview; Full text. 22 Immutable Laws Of Branding onoroff.biz Most companies develop their branding strategies as if advertising were their The Internet cannot be a free. This marketing classic has been expanded to include new commentary, new illustrations, and a bonus book: The 11 Immutable Laws of Internet Branding. The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding [Ries, Al, Ries, Laura] on onoroff.biz *​FREE* shipping Get your Kindle here, or download a FREE Kindle Reading App. The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding: How to Build a Product or Service into a Download it once and read it on your Kindle device, PC, phones or tablets. Read with the free Kindle apps (available on iOS, Android, PC & Mac), Kindle. Read The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding by Al Ries,Laura Ries with a free trial. Read unlimited* books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Also covered in this edition is a quick-start guide to getting net-savvy, a survival requirement in the Web marketing world. Modern smartphones and computers can read files of any format. Combining The 22 Immutable Laws of Branding and The 11 Immutable Laws of Internet Branding, this book proclaims that the only way to stand out in today's marketplace is to build your product or service into a brand—and provides the step-by-step instructions you need to do so. Moreover points are outlined that should be considered to support the successful use of Emotional Branding. It gives a definition of Emotional Branding and a short introduction to the instruments that can be used to support the brand elements, which are closer explained in the main part. Inhaltsverzeichnis:Table of Contents: 1. Brand managers, marketers, and executives have long turned to the trusted principles in Brand Aid to troubleshoot their branding problems. Through the collection of selected articles, the book which makes for an easy read, also tackles the future of brands and branding. This time is necessary for searching and sorting links. Bold and accessible, The Fall of Advertising is bound to turn the world of marketing upside down. Your email address will not be published. We do not store files, because it is prohibited. That's where your future market is going to be. the 22 immutable laws of branding pdf free download